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Business modelling domain  Foreword
REQUIREMENTS DOMAIN
 Requirements domain

 

Requirements domain
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    A requirements model for e-Government is shown in Figure 6. 


     

    A requirements model for e-Government is shown in Figure 6. 


  2. Figure 6 : e-Health requirements model 

Operational / application activities include: 

 

  1. Manage the identity of the patient to ensure that it is secure and strictly confidential to those who are authorised to see the information 

  1. Provide health care to all citizens 

  2. Manage professional medical institutions by verifying qualifications  supported by certificates, diplomas, degrees, etc

  1. Provide and manage medical practitioners by verifying qualifications and CVs of practitioners such as doctors, surgeons and nurses 

  2. Supply and monitor funds 

  3. Keep medical records up to date of doctors, patients, biological data, etc 

 

  1. Management activities 

     

    Management activities 

     

The requirements for management activities should specify the management tools, techniques and procedures, which have to be employed to ensure that all the information, roles and responsibilities, processes and technologies are in place to manage identity activities. These should include the management of projects, finance, human and technology resources.  

  1.  

     

      1. Business modelling domain

  1.  

    A stakeholder model for e-Health is shown in Figure 7 which represents a “typical” structure of a national health service. The government policies are determined by parliament and performed by the various departments and agencies.  The Connected Health initiative considers the “requirements of e-Health interoperability which aim to provide systems and services that are connected and can work together easily and effectively, while maintaining patient and professional confidentiality, privacy and security”.


    Figure 7: Typical stakeholders within health sector 

     

    A stakeholder model for e-Health is shown in Figure 7 which represents a “typical” structure of a national health service. The government policies are determined by parliament and performed by the various departments and agencies.  The Connected Health initiative considers the “requirements of e-Health interoperability which aim to provide systems and services that are connected and can work together easily and effectively, while maintaining patient and professional confidentiality, privacy and security”.


    Figure 7: Typical stakeholders within health sector 

 

4.1.3 Information management principles domain

  1. The principles of information management relating to e-Health are shown in Tables 5

    Health Sector – Identifiers / Credentials 

     

    The principles of information management relating to e-Health are shown in Tables 5

    Health Sector – Identifiers / Credentials 

     

Identity 

Secure and protect: 

   Information

   Computer systems

 

Destroy out of date information 

 

Ensure stakeholders  

& representatives are bona fide 

 

Protect:  

   Credit card usage

   Passwords

   PIN numbers

 

Delete unsolicited emails 

 

Monitor regularly: 

   Information

   Computer systems

   Vetting of personnel

 

Comply with statutes & regulations 

 

 

Purpose for use 

 

Application 

 

Lifecycle: 

   Input

   Storage

   Access

   Maintenance

   Deletion

 

Accuracy 

 

Authentication 

 

Authorisation 

 

Confidentiality 

 

Security 

 

Interoperability 

 

Identification 

 

Matching checks 

Paper 

 

Electronic 

  Web

  E-mail

 

Cards: 

  Credit (n)

  Store (n)

  Licence (n)

  Membership (n)

  Etc

 

Voice 

 

Face to face 

 

Camera (n) 

 

Scanner (n) 

 

RFID 

 

PET 

 

TET 

 

Databases 

Ensure all items are bona fide: 

 

Person (n)  

 

Stakeholders & their representatives 

 

Documents and copies 

 

Scans match with originals 

 

Computer systems 

 

Compliance with statutes & regulations 

 

 

 

  1. Table 5 

     

     

    Table 5 

     

     

4.4    e-Commerce

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e-Commerce consists primarily of distributing, buying, selling, marketing and servicing products and services over electronic systems such as the internet and other computer networks. It is vital that the electronic  transfer of identities and information, relating to individuals and organisations, are protected at an appropriate level.

  1. An example of a security standard is the PCI Data Security Standard which is  a set of comprehensive requirements for enhancing payment account data security. It was developed by the founding payment brands of the PCI Security Standards Council, including Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover Financial Services and JCB, to help facilitate the adoption of consistent data security measures on a global basis. The PCI DSS includes requirements for security management, policies, procedures, network architecture, software design and other critical protective measures. This comprehensive standard is intended to help organisations proactively protect customer identity and information.  

    An example of a security standard is the PCI Data Security Standard which is  a set of comprehensive requirements for enhancing payment account data security. It was developed by the founding payment brands of the PCI Security Standards Council, including Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover Financial Services and JCB, to help facilitate the adoption of consistent data security measures on a global basis. The PCI DSS includes requirements for security management, policies, procedures, network architecture, software design and other critical protective measures. This comprehensive standard is intended to help organisations proactively protect customer identity and information.  

4.4.1

 

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