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Bibliography  Identification versus anonymity in e-government
IDENTIFICATION AND ANONYMITY IN PUBLIC SERVICE PROVISION: TWO CASE STUDIES IN THE NETHERLANDS
 Public service provision

 

Identification and anonymity in public service provision: Two case studies in the Netherlands

Introduction

In chapter 3 of this report, a theoretical system was proposed which might enable measuring the degree of identifiability of citizens in their usage of public services. Building on this theory, in this chapter, two case studies conducted in the Dutch government setting are described in an attempt to discover whether whether the citizen becomes more or less identifiable in an e-government setting as compared to a paper-based government.  

In public service provision, the citizen usually gets authorized access to public services on the basis of form filling, writing letters, and/or submission of official documents which are proofs of entitlement to a certain public service. At the heart of government service provision are the personal identification of the citizen and the verification of that identity through authentication processes. This standardized process of service provision to citizens is known as bureaucracy and was traditionally mainly paper based. Nowadays, however, more and more public services are also provided electronically (Lips, 2006). This raises the questions: ‘To what extent does the application of new technologies in public service provision change the identification process of the citizen by the government?’ and ‘To what extent does the citizen become more anonymous or more known by the government when new technologies are applied in the process of public service provision?’ 

 

Bibliography  fidis-wp5.del5.4-anonymity-egov_01.sxw  Public service provision
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